Chemistry

Glowffiti – Invisible UV Glowing Graffiti Spray Paint

Invisible Glowing Graffiti
Invisible Glowing Graffiti with two colors: Red and Green

This is some invisible UV glowing paint I made recently. It’s a clear paint that glows brightly under UV lights. There are many reasons I can think of to¬† can be used to add invisible messages without obscuring preexisting signs or creating visual clutter. Also some fun uses could be to create city wide treasure hunts or secrete messages. The ink comes in two versions a plastic based version that you can screen print and a polyurethane version that you can spray. Here’s what the wall looks like during the day:

Invisible Glowing Wall During The Day
Wall with two skull tags imitating wall without tags

At night here’s a picture of it glowing with a UV LED flashlight:

Glowing at night with LED flashlight
You can see it using UV LED's as well!

The applications are endless, what would you do with this type of ink?
-bg

Glowtubbing – Glow in the dark hot tub

tEp is where I spend lots of my time and is filled with all sorts of magicians, mathematicians, musicians and makers. Recently during a rooftop lemonade party we set up a hot tub and filled with water at first, later I remembered I had some left over UV dye in the car, the colorful carnage that follows should not be replicated unless you fully understand the hazards:

Burnout Ink – Eating T-shirts

During the silk screening class I teach last week I brought in my experimental burnout ink.

Burnout ink worked!
Burnout ink worked!

We attempted to burn out several different fabric and fiber types. Here are a few tips we picked up:

  1. Make sure to saturate the fabric when you print so the ink goes through the shirt.
  2. Burn it out to a light golden brown, not any darker or you’ll stain the fabric.
  3. Wash immediately with cold water.
  4. Print on a towel with plastic on top (A soft platen helps with ink penetration)
  5. Screen print the design a few times with a high angle and lots of pressure.
  6. 50/50 polyester cotton blend fabric shirts didn’t work very well.
  7. 25 rayon 25 cotton 50 polyester worked the best

For many more pictures and some photo’s of the process check my picasa album.

-instructable soon
Bilal

Sodium Metasulfite and Guar Gum – How to make burn out ink

I eat shirts.

A gift came in the mail today, I’m the proud parent of two new bags of cocaine looking powders: Guar Gum and Sodium Metabisulfate. These two chemical compounds carry some heavy weight and should be extremely handy for my next project. Burnout Ink Flamethower Tee Shirt! The shirt may or may not throw flames, but the idea takes the combined properties of the two chemicals I bought to selectively eat a shirt to create sheer transparent layering effects.

The Sodium Metabisulfate, which I’ll call the shirt eater, is a chemical commonly used in tree stump removal. You pour some on and it eats the organic fibers that compose the tree and you now have a boring lawn. But what this also means is that the cotton parts of a shirt might be eaten leaving the non-organic parts (the polyester).

Awesome, now we need a carrier. Let’s bring in contestant #2! Gaur Gum!

Guar Gum will transport our chemicals to the shirt
Guar Gum will transport our chemicals to the shirt. (note: also not cocaine)

So now we have the active ingredient in our burnout ink we need something to transport it. Guar Gum is pretty neat stuff, it’s edible… actually it’s used as a binder in some medicines and it’s pretty non-reactive. This derivative of a bean is a perfect thickener, it’s a part of toothpaste and shampoo conditioner. It does not gel on it’s own, so wikipedia suggests borax, I’d like to see what kind of gel it turns into (perhaps this has a use in some casting applications as well?)

Soon we’ll give this a shot and a new design will be up at modati’s hack line of shirts. Home burnt shirts homeboys.

Yo

-BG